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After the release of the Nike Zoom All Out Low running shoe in 2016, we finally had the chance to give it a try and review its features. After decades of being one of Nike’s most appreciated technologies, the brand decided to leave in full view the 2/3 Zoom midsole of this version. Often used for basketball or tennis shoes, this signature technology from Nike is known for its low profile, designed to make it easier for athletes to make complex moves without sacrificing cushioning and support. The Nike Zoom All Low was released as a running shoe but, as we know, Nike is always targeting the casual, every day shoe niche and this time is no different.

We skipped the hi top version that was first released and went for the low one that we got on sale for $100. The seaweed and volt pair was the one we got our hands on and I can tell that right out the box it looked great and felt pretty light, while a bit stiff on the sole side. It was soon time to do with it what it was advertised as: take it running. Let me say first off that the visible Zoom Air unit not only adds a nice aesthetic touch, it does provide a really cushiony bed for your feet. With that said, let’s get into the finer details.

Upper

The upper of the Nike Zoom Air Low is made from engineered mesh, a move away form the Flyknit the hi top version featured. Nevertheless, it adds some support much needed for the low top runner, while being highly breathable and deliver a glove-like fit. In addition, Flywire support for the laces helps to enhance lockdown, wrapping the shoe securely onto the feet, and there is also a partial mesh layer lining that helps to reinforce comfort as you move.

During this Nike Zoom All Out low review it felt pretty flexible and comfortable on my feet, whether I was taking a slow jog or working out. These main features are what I feel many will appreciate about the Zoom All Out Low, as well as the extra support offered by the heel counter to improve stability.

Sole Unit

As mentioned, the Nike Zoom All Out Low shoe comes with a visible Zoom Air unit, which runs three-quarters its length. Looks aside, it does give you that true ‘walking on air feeling and responsiveness that the Nike Air Zoom products are known for. However, the feeling is enhanced due to the use of cushy Cushlon foam in the midsole, as well as the ribbed rubber crash rail running around the sides that help to promote foot flexibility. Underneath all that is a durable, waffle-tread rubber outsole that provides great traction and shock absorbance.

This combination of technologies in the sole unit makes up for a steady ride, feeling like walking on bubbles. Some runners might find it as a strange feeling, as the sole is low and a bit on the stiff side. It is the reason why many might enjoy it as an all day sneaker rather than a running shoe. It does feel great even after long hours of standing or walking around. As far as running goes, I appreciated the noticeable responsiveness while running on the track or asphalt. I didn’t have any problems with slippage on damp or wet surfaces. This sneaker also makes up for a decent training shoe, offering great support when sudden moves are made, a characteristic of the Zoom technology.

Bottom Line

To conclude my Nike Zoom All Out Low review, this is a running shoe built for those who want to stay active and remain comfortable while at it. But its multiple colorways and unique design also make it great for those who want it for its looks. I used it for both, easily pairing it with jeans and t-shirt, as well as running gear.

I will conclude by saying that the Zoom All Out Low is near-perfect for basic running, exercising and just looking good, but will show flaws when put to the test for performance running. Hopefully this gets better as Nike continues to build on the great reputation laid down by the original.

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